Lambing, 13.4.17

This day was a lot quieter than Wednesday, but I did lamb a single in the field at 6.30am.  

 

During the morning field checks, the vet student and I noticed a weak lamb in the triplet field so we took the lamb back into the barn to administer alamycin and for TLC under the heat lamp.

  
I stayed in the barn for the majority of the day mothering on lambs and being responsible for the pet lambs as they were brought in. This meant that I got even more practice stomach tubing, so I am confident with my newly acquired skill. 

When a ewe was brought in, as it was my second to last day, I was given the opportunity to lamb it as it was not a straight forward case… that is all I was told as I had to work out the positioning myself. The lambs head flicked backwards, and the ewe was so tight that it took a while to bring the lambs head forward. Every time I repositioned my hand, the lamb slipped the opposite way. It was made even more difficult with the ewe’s pelvic bones digging into my hands (I had bruises on my hands for weeks). I was determined not to be defeated, so after injecting oxytocin and hexasol, I used a lot of lube to successfully position the head correctly. I then traced down to find the legs and pulled them forward, before pulling the lambs head and legs simultaneously. I wish I had this moment on video, I had never been so ecstatic to lamb- it was hugely rewarding. Knowing I have saved so many lambs and ewes’ lives is an incredible feeling, and something that drives me to making the difficult but rewarding task into a vet career.

  
During the evening field check, I then lambed twins and a single. After another 15 hour day, I was straight to bed!

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