Cronkshaw Fold Farm, Goat herd update, November 2017

November has been the month of the goats.

In 18 months, I have gone from a ‘put the bucket under the hay-net and put hurdles upside down, avid textbook reader’ to an accredited artificial inseminator with over 2,000 hours of work experience in the veterinary and associated industries.

Before I head off on my winter travels, I will share a blog post about my greatest NON ACADEMIC achievements of 2017, to bring this rollercoaster of a year to a close. A great emphasis on the non-academic because numbers should not define happiness, let’s stamp out the burn-out academic culture.

The quote ‘some beautiful paths cannot be discovered without getting lost’ is fitting. Whilst mental illness will always have negative impacts on my wellbeing and life, every cloud has a silver lining. The road to my heart is paved with goat-hoof-prints, you can read more about my journey here: https://mammalsandmicroscopes.wordpress.com/2017/01/31/animals-are-my-therapy/

From the goat veterinary society meeting to the British Goat Society accredited AI course, November made me feel like the luckiest crazy-goat-lady.
Meeting pioneers of an area of veterinary medicine I am so dedicated to study is an invaluable opportunity to learn from their wealth of knowledge and expertise. Discussing the future of goat veterinary medicine with qualified veterinarians, students, farmers, pet-owners, is inspiring and fuels my drive to make a difference for this super species.

Shout out to my dad for building this brilliant milking stand for the goats, so we could appropriately restrain the goats to minimise stress during the artificial insemination course.

I am sure that if my goats were allowed in my house, they would become part of the furniture. Family!


I had no problem getting my Guernseys to jump up so let’s hope they behave during milking *fingers crossed*.

 


Although Esme and Lyra were empty, after positioning the probe correctly with the curtain of hair, it is a lesson for future goat breeding.
Despite being the most placid gentle giant, Jasper loves his food (like all goats) so became boisterous at feeding time. I believed that he had spent enough time with the girls to have done the deed, I was wrong.
It is not as though Jasper is going to complain!
They are one happy family again. Fingers crossed for the next month, but what is meant to be is meant to be.

Keeping animals is not all sunshine and rainbows. Like humans they get ill, sometimes we won’t have a definite diagnosis.

In the process of elimination, I took a faecal egg sample from one of the sick doelings. Again, another future blog post will cover the faecal egg sampling service and the main worm culprits that make goats unwell. Thanks toWest Gate Labs for their speedy, efficient service.

The rapid results showed that a relatively large strongyle egg and liver fluke burden had been identified. All of the Boers were treated immediately, to prevent any others from deteriorating.

Back to positive news! On the 13th November, Red the billy goat, was placed in the pen with the Boer does. The joys of kidding time will be a break from my A level exams in the summer, a time to switch off from studying.

Another November achievement is the confidence Lyra has gained. Okay, maybe she now needs to learn manners of not running out of the pen. But the timid ‘Esmé shadow’ is now running around the barn having the time of her life jumping on the straw stairs.

Maisie even walked up to the farm with me to meet my goats.

 

On the 25th November, I attended the grand opening of the new farm classroom. It was a great event, albeit cold.

A huge congratulations to Dot, who’s vision has come to life through a LOT of hard work!

 

This is the last goat update of 2017 due to the upcoming blogs of 2017.

So here are a few of my favourite photos from November!

Featuring the incredible goat barn signs commissioned by Sara from https://www.etsy.com/uk/shop/DandelionsGallery❤️

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