Large animal vets, Day 5, 7.7.17

My final day began with a yard visit to see two more horses.
The first had sarcoids, sarcoids are tumours that won’t metastasise (meaning they won’t spread to internal organs).
There are 6 different types of sarcoid.
  • Nodular
  • Verrucose
  • Fibroblastic
  • Occult
  • Mixed
  • Malevolent
Similarly, there is a wide range of treatments from cryosurgery and ligation to immunomodulation.
It was interesting to discuss immunomodulation with the vet because I study human tuberculosis in my biology A level immunology option.
The Bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG) vaccination used in humans can be injected into equine sarcoids to enhance the immune response and to cause tumour regression.
The vet then did a dynamic assessment on a second horse, sadly the horse could not progress to the trotting stage due to the severe lameness.
A vet can advise owners, but it is ultimately their choice and the decision was made for the knackerman to humanely shoot the horse.
There were two euthanasia options, barbiturate overdose or shot. The lethal injection ensures that the horse is going to be incinerated or cremated, whilst shooting a horse has more disposal options. (Horse meat scandal!)
There are many advantages and disadvantages to both procedures, but unless it is an emergency case, it is personal preference of the owner who may have a 25 year relationship with their animal.
An interesting case was an impromptu calf post-mortem to check for calf diphtheria.
Fusiformis necrophorus can enter the soft tissue when the epithelial lining of the mouth is damaged, it then forms a pus-covered ulcer. Ulcers at the back of the tongue create great difficulties for swallowing, and the infection can pass into the lungs and cause fatalities.
However there were no identifiable calf diphtheria ulcers, and the cause of death was not determined. For detailed microscopic tissue analysis, the necropsy would be sent to a post-mortem service with a pathology report and in-depth carcass examination.

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