Equine Breeding and Stud Medicine Course – 17/3/19

1. HOW I FOUND LAUNDER FARM

“SUCCESS IS WHERE PREPARATION AND OPPORTUNITY MEET.”

After expressing my desire to gain more experience and knowledge in the equine sector, the wonderful Woes of Wellies suggested that I looked at Launder Farm Experience Day’s Equine Breeding and Stud Medicine Course.

The team at Launder Farm rapidly replied to my questions on Instagram DMs – I had the feeling that I could not miss this opportunity! I immediately looked at train tickets and reserved my place on the 1-day course in Wales. 

2. HOW I TRAVELLED TO LAUNDER FARM

“LIFE IS AN ADVENTURE.”

Manchester -> Shrewsbury -> Welshpool

If you have read my Moat Goats blog, you will know that I like to hop on a train for a little adventure (even though I usually have bad luck).  Luckily, despite the torrential downpours and stormy winds, I had a pleasant two trains to Welshpool. Made even better with a Pret breakfast. 

The lovely Becky, a member of the Launder Farm team, picked me up from the train station and drove me to Launder Farm.

3. MY EXPERIENCE AT LAUNDER FARM

GREAT TEACHERS

Launder Farm offers the perfect balance of theory and practical learning. 

Before we headed outside we had a seminar on equine breeding and behaviour. As a horse-handling-newbie it was helpful to learn the theory of body language before heading outside. It was also interesting to see the theory recreated by the horses:
Tail lift -> Squat -> Pee
The mare had obviously read the textbook!

As I have completed a goat artificial insemination course, it was particularly interesting to hear the discussion of the use of horse AI. Different aspects of the seminars will supplement your prior work experience and current knowledge.

The second seminar covered colic, lameness, and stud medicine. As my knowledge on horses is far greater than my practical experience, it was the perfect consolidation and summary session. 

The seminars have definitely prepared me for vet school interviews – they can throw an Equine influenza question at me!

GREAT LEARNING ENVIRONMENT

From applying stable bandages and head collars, to moving mares into stocks – I took away an abundance of new practical skills. 

Despite having completed placements at a stud farm, mixed farm and equine practices, and an equine practice, I have limited hands-on-experience with horses.  I can’t thank the staff at Launder Farm enough for creating such a relaxed learning environment. 

No questions were silly questions. ZERO judgement. 

GREAT EXPERIENCE

I can’t recommend Launder Farm Experience Days enough. 
A 10/10 experience. 

 

Dairy placement: I goat this, 13.11.18

“If you want the rainbow, you gotta put up with the rain”

Not a pot of gold, but even better.

Goats were at the end of my rainbow.

Another day off work is another day heading to the goat dairy farm for work experience as I am eager to continue developing my understanding, skills, knowledge, and abilities, for a future in veterinary medicine.

Immersing myself into goat farming, I can see that the dream of becoming a caprine specialist is not a far-off fantasy. From the large scale milking of Saanens, and rearing Boers for meat, to the pet Pygmies, there is an increasing demand for speciality medicine.

Goats are not sheep, and they are certainly not small cows.
Goats are goats.

“I want to go about like the light-footed goats.” : Johanna Spyri, Heidi.

A Heidi photo update is a great opportunity to talk polled goat genetics, an interesting topic.

Polled is dominant allele, so is expressed in the homozygous or heterozygous state. However, homozygous dominant is linked with intersex does (genetically female) as the intersex linked gene is recessive therefore expressed in the homozygous individuals.

Heidi the goat is heterozygous!

“Change is the end result of all true learning.”

Ensuring that the kids are feeding regularly is a very important job on a dairy unit, because after 12 hours, the kids (with a belly full of colostrum) are grouped into pens. They now have human mothers!

There is a critical time period after kidding, during which the kids can absorb immunoglobulins. After 12 hours, the kids are extremely capable to begin learning how to feed from the teats and enjoy life with their small friends.

“Fall seven times, stand up eight.”

Identified on the farm as a problem most prevalent in the multiples, due to limited space in utero, I was taught how to aid the correction of contracted fetlock tendons. (Tendons connect muscle to bone.)

For some kids, I flexed the hoof upwards repeatedly to carefully stretch the tendon to correct hoof placement on the ground. 
However, more severe cases require splinting for support above and below the joint. A splint was secured with vet wrap, over the soft cotton layers to ensure comfort. 

“Here we goat again”

Another opportunity to milk the 1,500+ goats on the rotary parlour.

With smaller fat globules, and less lactose, goats milk is a great alternative to cows milk. Found in the small intestine epithelium.  lactase is the enzyme that hydrolyses the glycosidic bond in lactose to produce glucose and galactose. If an individual does not produce sufficient amounts of lactase, the lactose is not digested and causes discomfort as it passes to the colon. Diarrhoea results from the lowered water potential causing water to move into the colon, and the bacteria breaking down the lactose release gases. 

Goats milk is also delicious. Have I sold it to you? 🙂