Victoria’s Story: Animals are my entire world

VICTORIA

Victoria 1

ANIMALS ARE MY ENTIRE WORLD

MY MOTIVATIONS CHANGED

Victoria 2

As a vet student, it probably goes without saying that animals are my entire world, but perhaps not for the reasons you’d think! 

I’ve wanted to be a vet for as long as I can remember, and certainly back then my reasons were most likely to do with liking the idea of spending my time nosing on other people’s farms and seeing to their cows and sheep. However, somewhere along my journey, my motivations changed.

CONSTANT SOURCE OF COMFORT

Now, following a long string of work experience and a little more life experience, I understand how important animals are to so many people and am constantly amazed by the unique role they play in the happiness of humans. So, if someone were to ask me now why I want to be a vet, I wouldn’t be making something up or stuttering on ‘erm…I don’t know’ anymore.

Animals are a constant source of comfort and strength, whether that be as a loving fur friend, or in the context of livestock, provide a lifestyle that may be hard work and unsociable, but is one that so many people are defined by, and I never find it hard to motivate myself to help people keep the animals that mean so much to them.

FEELING AT HOME

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As a child, I was lucky enough to spend a lot of time on my grandparents’ small holding, where my Grandad taught me almost everything I know about looking after sheep, which remain my favourite animals to work with. I learned to feed lambs, feed sheep, get them into the shed, carry lambs so the mothers would follow and so on, but the most striking thing I learned was that I never felt more at home than when I was surrounded by animals.

KEEP PLODDING ON 

As my love and understanding of animals grew, so did my motivations to train as a veterinary surgeon, so you can imagine how happy I was to end up here at the University of Liverpool on their Veterinary Science course. I am truly thankful every day that I got the opportunity to train, but that doesn’t mean that vet school has been a smooth road! Of course there’s the obvious, such as exam stress (I HATE exams!!), deadline stress, and the stress you get just trying to keep on top of lectures, but there’s also tiredness, being away from home (especially when you’re ill- it’s awful being away from familiarities and feeling on your own!), and pressures like finance that most of us have never had to deal with before.

Sometimes, the stress gets too much and you wonder why you bother; but then Easter comes around and you get to go home and do work experience placements, usually on a lambing farm in first and second year. For me, just a couple of hours on a farm is more than enough to remind me why I wanted to do this in the first place and helps me keep plodding on, even when the workload seems way too heavy for me.

A WHOLE NEW SENSE OF PURPOSE 

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One farm in particular has become a huge part of my world, and that’s an arable, dairy and sheep farm up in the North East of England. As I said, vet school is great but is definitely not always plain sailing, and I have faced many challenges since coming to Liverpool: adapting to being in a city, feeling inadequate, and sometimes feeling just out of place and useless in surroundings that just don’t seem quite as much like ‘home’.

I was struggling most in my second year at uni, which is when this farm took me in. Suddenly, I felt like I had found something I was good at (milking cows and lambing sheep) and this kick started my motivation and gave me a whole new sense of purpose. Even when I’m doing okay, this place brightens up my day in a way that nothing else seems to. I have learned so much from spending time on this farm and love the place and the people very dearly.

ANIMALS ARE MY WORLD

In short, animals are my world and I truly believe it’s the same for a very large proportion of people in the world. Being a vet and a farmer has become a massive part of my personality and makes me who I am: I may be looked down on for having dirty hands, I may be called hypocritical for ‘loving animals but still working on farms where they are bred for food’, I may be told I’m not clever enough and I can’t do it, but at the end of the day, I was made to be a vet and my love of animals will not let me fail.

VICTORIA

Blog: https://barkingmadvet.video.blog/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Barking-Mad-592686627844164/

A vet student’s perspective: Animals Are My Therapy

INTRODUCTION

After following Barkind Mad Vet for a while, I was keen to reach out to Victoria to contribute to Animals are my therapy.

In the meantime of writing her personal story to share on here, Victoria has shared the wider perspective as a vet student on her blog. 

So here is part one of Victoria’s Animals are my therapy story.

BARKING MAD VET BLOG POST:

Following last week’s blog, I have started working on a much more personal post surrounding the title ‘Animals Are My Therapy’, on a blog published by an amazing pre-vet student with a special message to share.

My animal therapy story has been one of the hardest things I’ve written so far, mainly because after sitting with a blank piece of paper, I didn’t know where to start! I quickly realised that animals have shaped my personality and now my career choices in countless ways. Although I can’t think of a specific significant event, being surrounded by animals has grown to be what makes me feel at home.

I could now go off on a tangent with several anecdotes and memories, but I want to focus on the bigger picture; I know for a fact that I am not the only person who finds comfort and strength through a four-legged friend (or a feathered friend!) and this is my major motivation for training as a vet.

The obvious role of a vet is the one most people see: a general practitioner in the consulting room with them, trying to cure their dog’s recent stomach upset or treat his painful leg. However, if you look a bit closer, you see the vet taking time to explain what’s wrong with the pet, describing different treatment options, going through positives and negatives, being patient, and helping the owner make a decision. When you can help an owner leave the vets feeling reassured and confident that they’ve made the right decision, it is just as important and just as rewarding as treating their pet.

Working as a vet on a farm is quite different to working with dogs and cats; whilst farmers do passionately care about their livestock, a vet has to be more aware of the business element of the decisions a farmer has to make. As you’ll know if you’re read some of my other blogs, I spend a lot of my time on farms when I’m back home in the North East and I know how much a farmer wants to help his stock. There is no better feeling than when a vet helps you design a treatment plan which allows the cow or sheep or pig to be treated within you budget! Alongside being their livelihood, farm animals are quite often the pride and joy of their owners, who have been working hard to build up their pedigree for generations; this explains the disastrous consequences the Foot and Mouth outbreak of 2001 when so many farmers faced severe depression and even suicide after losing their stock.

So, as a vet, vet nurse, vet student, nursing student, or an aspiring veterinary professional, it’s super important to remember what an amazing job the profession is doing in working to make sure that humans can keep their animals in the best possible conditions, and keep their four legged friends by their side for as long as possible. Keep going everyone, you’re doing great!

If I’ve not quite convinced you how much animals mean to humans, or if you just want to read some amazing animal therapy stories, check out the ‘Animals Are My Therapy’ tab of Mammalsandmicroscopes: an amazing set of stories put together by an awesome soon-to-be vet student! Well done Heidi, your message is super special and very very important!

FOLLOW VICTORIA

BLOG: Barking Mad Vet

FACEBOOK: Barking Mad

Equine Breeding and Stud Medicine Course – 17/3/19

1. HOW I FOUND LAUNDER FARM

“SUCCESS IS WHERE PREPARATION AND OPPORTUNITY MEET.”

After expressing my desire to gain more experience and knowledge in the equine sector, the wonderful Woes of Wellies suggested that I looked at Launder Farm Experience Day’s Equine Breeding and Stud Medicine Course.

The team at Launder Farm rapidly replied to my questions on Instagram DMs – I had the feeling that I could not miss this opportunity! I immediately looked at train tickets and reserved my place on the 1-day course in Wales. 

2. HOW I TRAVELLED TO LAUNDER FARM

“LIFE IS AN ADVENTURE.”

Manchester -> Shrewsbury -> Welshpool

If you have read my Moat Goats blog, you will know that I like to hop on a train for a little adventure (even though I usually have bad luck).  Luckily, despite the torrential downpours and stormy winds, I had a pleasant two trains to Welshpool. Made even better with a Pret breakfast. 

The lovely Becky, a member of the Launder Farm team, picked me up from the train station and drove me to Launder Farm.

3. MY EXPERIENCE AT LAUNDER FARM

GREAT TEACHERS

Launder Farm offers the perfect balance of theory and practical learning. 

Before we headed outside we had a seminar on equine breeding and behaviour. As a horse-handling-newbie it was helpful to learn the theory of body language before heading outside. It was also interesting to see the theory recreated by the horses:
Tail lift -> Squat -> Pee
The mare had obviously read the textbook!

As I have completed a goat artificial insemination course, it was particularly interesting to hear the discussion of the use of horse AI. Different aspects of the seminars will supplement your prior work experience and current knowledge.

The second seminar covered colic, lameness, and stud medicine. As my knowledge on horses is far greater than my practical experience, it was the perfect consolidation and summary session. 

The seminars have definitely prepared me for vet school interviews – they can throw an Equine influenza question at me!

GREAT LEARNING ENVIRONMENT

From applying stable bandages and head collars, to moving mares into stocks – I took away an abundance of new practical skills. 

Despite having completed placements at a stud farm, mixed farm and equine practices, and an equine practice, I have limited hands-on-experience with horses.  I can’t thank the staff at Launder Farm enough for creating such a relaxed learning environment. 

No questions were silly questions. ZERO judgement. 

GREAT EXPERIENCE

I can’t recommend Launder Farm Experience Days enough. 
A 10/10 experience.